Painting of the week: “Osage chiasm”

This week’s featured painting is an odd one I created way back in 2009.  “Osage chiasm” (that’s chiasm not chasm) is 20″H by 16″W, and is acrylic on canvas.  The piece is essentially a stylized portrait of one of my favorite trees: a very old Osage orange that lives on the Nethermead in Prospect Park, Brooklyn.  This painting has been in my living room for the past several years, and I look at it every day.  The photo doesn’t quite do it justice: the colors are weird and don’t reproduce well.  In the real life the blues of the sky are considerably more vivid.

“Osage chiasm” acrylic on canvas, 20×16″, 2009.

Featured painting of the week

This week’s featured painting is “Reach” — a triptych I created in 2012.  This painting and some other square format paintings I created then were precursors to my Lifeworld series, and should almost be considered honorary members of the series.

“Reach” (triptych), oil on canvas, 20″ x approx 60″. 2012
“Reach” detail, 2012.
“Reach” detail, 2012.
“Reach” detail, 2012.

Featured Painting of the Week: Bonsai in Bloom

The featured painting of the week is back after a short hiatus.  This week we have “Bonsai in Bloom,” a painting in acrylic I created in 2010.  The painting is 30 inches wide (about 76cm) and 24 inches tall (60cm).  It is available for sale and is listed in my Square store.  Of course, if you would like to see the painting in person, contact me and we’ll make a date!

"Bonsai in Bloom", acrylic on canvas, 24x30", 2010

Project: 365

Back in October, I started a new, year-long project to document my ongoing practice of visual exploration.  I think of this exploration as central to the work of the artist.  I’m calling the project simply “365” and the end result (to the extent that a project like this ever ends) will be 365 small watercolors presented at this year’s Gowanus Open Studios, October 17-18.

I started the project on or about October 19, immediately after last year’s Open Studios, and we are now more or less at the six-month mark.  So I’m evaluating how the project is going and taking a first crack at formulating some sort of artist’s statement about the work.  I’m also beginning the arduous task of scanning some exemplars of the work.  I’m certainly not going to scan all 365 pieces I create!

365 exemplar from late 2014. Watercolor on paper, 4×6″ 

The project is bookended by the Open Studio event that happens each year in October.  I’ve taken part in Gowanus Open Studios every year since 2007, and I’ve often experienced it as the beginning and end of my artistic cycle.

So what goes on in my typical artist’s year?  This project seeks to outline just that.  It represents a year in the life of the artist — or in other words, a year of practice, process  and exploration.

Fantastical self-portrait, watercolor, 6×4″, February, 2015

As I said, all of the work created for this project is small (between approximately 3×5 inches and 8×8 inches) and all of the work is watercolor.  Included are portraits and self-portraits, improvised sketches and landscapes real and unreal, life-drawing, completely abstract work, flights of the imagination and studies for future larger paintings.  All stuff of which the artist’s practice is made.

365 pieces will be displayed in October, and all will be offered to the public on a “pay as you wish” basis.  Here are some exemplars of the work created so far. Mark your calendars now! Gowanus Open Studios 2015 is October 17-18.

December 2014, watercolor, approx. 4×4″ 
October, 2014
Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, late October, 2014
December 2014
December 2014
November 2014
November 2014
December 2014
December 2014

Featured Painting of the Week: ‘Camperdown Pareidolia’

This week’s featured painting is titled “Camperdown Pareidolia.” Completed late in 2010, this painting was a transitional piece between what I was doing throughout most of 2010 (for example Calamus I, completed in early 2010) and the sort of work I starting doing in 2011 and beyond.

"Camperdown pareidolia", mixed media on canvas, 24Hx30W", 2010.
“Camperdown pareidolia”, mixed media on canvas, 24Hx30W”, 2010.

“Camperdown Pareidolia” is 24″ (approx. 60cm) by 30″ (76cm) wide. This piece is “mixed media” on canvas and is noteworthy being composed largely with R&F oil pigment sticks.

The title of piece came about in a sort of unpremeditated way.  The piece was inspired by the Camperdown Elm, a somewhat famous specimen tree in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, so that part’s a given.  I showed it to a friend of mine who felt that she saw a figure in the painting, which is not there (at least not intentionally). She introduced me to the term pareidolia — a pyschological phenomenon where a random sense stimulus (image or sound) is perceived as significant.  The classic example is seeing forms in clouds. This has since become one of my favorite words, even serving as the name of my tumblr blog!

“Camperdown pareidolia” is for sale, and is listed through my Square online store.

Enjoy!